No Worries, It's Good Enough - Leadership SHIFT Tip

A couple of years ago, I bought a new racing bike with a different setup. It was more aggressive by just one little centimeter. No big deal, right?

During my first few rides, I could feel the difference. My new bike was faster, but something wasn’t right. No worries, I thought. And since I wanted it to work, I called it “good enough” believing that I would get comfortable with it.

And I did, but, eventually, good enough wasn’t good enough. Over time, I noticed some stiffness in my Achilles — which I ignored and chalked up to my cycling accident and getting older. Then, seemingly overnight, the stiffness turned to pain.

Given my bio-mechanical limitations, my only option was to stop riding and rest. And since the universe as a knack for timing, all of this was happening before two key cycling events on my calendar. Awesome, um, well, not so much.

It turns out that some little things, like my centimeter, matter. When not acknowledged and multiplied by many revolutions, the consequences can be painful.

Sometimes it’s wise to work on the small stuff like the little grudge you been holding or the self-doubt that pops up when your inner critic pays a visit.

They may seem like no big deals and good enough to leave alone. After all, they’re small concerns until your revolutions start to add up.

In a world that values being busy, it’s important to gain some awareness and acceptance before you keep pedaling. It just may help you minimize some potentially painful consequences.

Have Fun Storming the Castle!

A huge thank you to everyone who helped Shift: Better Tomorrows Creatingreach best-seller status with Amazon within Management & Leadership/Teams. All proceeds go to World Bicycle Relief.

A huge thank you to everyone who helped Shift: Better Tomorrows Creatingreach best-seller status with Amazon within Management & Leadership/Teams. All proceeds go to World Bicycle Relief.

Amazon

“It’s the little details that are vital. Little things make big things happen.”
- John Wooden

 

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